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about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico border of 1846. grant said at the time i do not think there was ever more wicked were then that waged by the united states of mexico. i thought so at the time when i was the dexter, only i had not moral courage enough to resign. during the time of the u.s.-mexico war, i just found this are really moving "which is why it took it for my title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. wanted to talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s.-mexico war from being with it -- really enthusiastic and in favor to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. there was anti-war sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happen is a consensus across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field to officers, politicians, all the
to talk about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and grant during the time that the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. i found this a really moving quotes so he took it from a typo. the fact is grant was not allowed in thinking the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing i talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war, which is not about word by any means from being really t
, and the 1946 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title, "a wicked war", is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from late in his life, grant look back on his career and in his memoir he writes about the experiences that he had, good and the bad. it makes for good reading. one thing that grant spent some time talking about leaving his wife with his role in the us-mexico border of 1986 -- 1846. >> i found is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of th
within the u.s. and the west and libya was a time which i had lived as a junior diplomat from 2004-2006 when a small group of us were sent to tripoli to basically laid the foundation for picking the embassy. i, you know, spend a lot of time in the middle east, sometimes i wonder whether i should a steady japanese like when i was in college because the degree of change ability, it's a drama continuing, but there's a certain something about the region and the people and the disparate culture which is really quite gripping and the more that you get into it the more you become passionate about it. i'm simply very passionate about libya. essentially some of the reflections that i heard, the commentary that was made to me while i was posted in libya were basically driving desire to write this book because a number of people came up to me. very surprising in different contexts, different taxi drivers, police to make lots of money as middlemen between the regime and the private sector, former mark -- former monarchy, people who have been parliamentarians' back in the 60's said, look, we un
in the u.s., but we did it and we were condemned by the u.s., the state department. we were condemned by the u.n. years later, people appreciated the grave issue he took was for the benefit of the american people. because then you invade iraq come you are able to go into iraq without the risk of the iraqi nuclear. thus go back to 1973. i'm sure some jewish people and the audience and for us, the jewish people yom kippur is the holiest day of the year, where we go to the shore, we pray 1973 turn yom kippur. even though i thought i knew everything before i wrote the book. when i was doing the research i learned myself a lot. i found out 1973 congress by surprise, were almost an appointment would've lost the war. in the middle of the war, we can go to the sea. it's not the war in vietnam or afghanistan. it means rout of the game to make it to a crucial point in the first day of the war that we were invaded from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, t
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
, the overseas applications of you as two activities either a director in significant effect in the u.s. commerce for the potential for evasion. we support the goals of title vii which provide great transparency and increased oversight of the swaps market. there is growing concern of the cftc and divergence and the sec regarding the process and timing in the house slots and security base wipes are a furry and declines. as the committee is aware, the industry is facing quickly approaching the highest deadline. without the benefit of final payments with the international scope of these rules. the lack of clarity related to the rules cross-border application manifests itself in particular with respect to three aspects. the cftc sdc to more pressing concerns with the requirements. the first is to has to register as a swap deal or. given the nature register, firms of which make decisions if i look so as to which entities to register with the cftc. making these decisions without being fully informed to the rules that apply in literal take to comply and position untenable love love and predict ability.
to be the best of all pleasures to introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person addicted to both politics and academic and women's history, i and i'm sure all of us are interested in this presentation so thanks for being here. you couldn't be in a better counter this talky their since much of grand rapids has been very highly invested in the health-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of
about 18, and 239 remaining. the susan b. anthony dollars, one of the most ill-fated in the u.s. government. it looks just like 1/4. it was only made 79-81 for three years. it was the last regular issued government issued coin they made the san francisco mint uncirculated condition with the proof. it had all kinds of problems. it makes it a commercial failure but makes it a collectable absolutesaffordable at $129 and a customer pick but $109.95 the most affordablen set released by the u.s. government of all the coin sets we have. the 1999 season the anthony. most people do not even know that coin exists. it was not in the proofset and not man said. that coin you gotta individually--mint- set coin! these, $79 apiece.are $109 across the board for everything that you see. >>host: explain where you get numbers. >>guest: i talked about getting individually and the reason is pretty simple. people buy coins individually to build their sets. when i say if purchased individually that is the way most people put their coins together. the coin catalog they are the lord largest coin c
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
with politics and public affairs, we casey jennings live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watched key public policy defense. every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs, get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> twenty-five years ago the u.s. and the soviet union signed a treaty which removed thousands of nuclear missiles from europe. former reagan administration officials talk about the negotiations that led to the intermediate nuclear forces treaty. at this event hosted by the american foreign service association, it's an hour 20 minutes. >> okay. i think we're ready to go. i would invite everyone to take their seats. i'd like to wish all a very good morning. i'm susan johnson, the president of afsa, and i'd like to extend a very warm afsa welcome to you all, and thank you for coming to this important and special panel discussion, and also celebration of the 25th anniversary of the signing the inf treaty. special thanks of course go to our panelists and our moderator, and i should n
senator mark warner on his plan to allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the u.s. at 8 eastern on c-span2, the president and incoming ceo of the nation's second biggest provider of medicare health plans, and at 8 eastern on c-span3, a discussion on scientific predictions about the future and the impact they have on public policy. .. but i think that there's no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but it is something -- there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly
as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representativ
of the inauguration of the president of the u.s. capitol. >> we are glad you are all here, this is the platform were the inauguration will take place. it is on schedule, it is on budget. our job, senator alexander and myself were in charge of this part of the inauguration. it is the presidential inaugural committee. it is also known as pic. let me review some numbers and specifics. the first inaugural on the west front was ronald reagan's ceremony in 1981. the person in charge of building the platform is steve ayers, the architect of the capital. the platform will be about 10,000 square feet. the same size as the platform in 2005, which was the largest platform ever built. as you know, on this there will be 1600 people were comes to this platform. it has to be very strong. the former president, joins you, governors, and the diplomatic corps. one of which comes from brooklyn, one comes from near chattanooga. it is a bipartisan concept inaugural. the platform is made whole with specification so everyone can see pretty well. the design began more than a year ago. construction began in september. >> tha
, international crisis group and the u.s. institute of peace. he has helped fund schools in darfur in refugee camps, now belongs to a satellite project with george clooney. mr. prendergast has worked for peace in africa for well over a quarter of a century. then we will hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at stanford university's hoover institution, and professor, lecture and african studies at johns hopkins university school of advanced international studies. mr. dizolele has testified several times before the congress. his work has appeared frequently in many major news publications, and he is a frequent commentator on african affairs on television and radio. he served as election monitor in the drc in 2006, and again in 2011. and has also been indicted with united nations peacekeepers as a reporter. in addition, he is a veteran of the united states marine corps. thank you for your service. and i'd like to now go to steve hege. >> chairman smith, ranking member bass, and members of the subcommittee on africa's global health and human rights, thank you for this invitation to
and democratic representative lynn woolsey of california. we will also show you a tribute in the u.s. house to outgoing caliber and california members of cameras.. join us at 8:00 p.m. eastern on c-span. later a look at the dodd-frank law and regulations. >> this is c-span3 with politics and public affairs programming throughout the week. and every weekend, 40 hours a people and events ,-com,-com ma telling the american story on american history tv. get schedules in the past programs our website. you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> tomorrow a draft constitution by mohammed morsi. it would expand his constitutional powers. supporters and opponents of president mohammed morsi. next, we'll talk about developments in the country and security throughout the region with an expert on the muslim brotherhood and a former israeli ambassador to egypt. this is an hour and a half. >> looking at the political competition with the egyptian and the egyptian society, what is likely to be the outcome, not just of the referendum, but the next step in the next several steps in this ongoi
" that sprung from the awful doldrums of the u.s. economy under jimmy carter apply stronger, more strongly today. >> house so click >> obama is the same kind of antibusiness president and insight president. same kind of managerial, interfering, strangling, surprising president jimmy carter was. >> you writing here about president obama. i want to get to the right page so i can quote it correctly, sir. you write under the obama administration that the u.s. had a morbid subversion of the infrastructures of its economy. the public sector has become a manipulative forest, aggressively intervening in the venture and financial sectors with guarantees and subventions that attract talent and debunking. >> the worst of this is the korean cast of the obama administration. the epa now has gained control over everything. see so to have been deemed a pollution, dangerous to the environment in co2 is of course that these plans. they attempt to surprise or two epitomize the anti-nature, enterprise spirit of this administration. the reason we need another supply-side revival of the same kind we had under ronald
to talk about the inspiration for his trip at 9 p.m. eastern. >> u.s. intelligence officials said wednesday that the syria military head loaded the precursor chemicals for a deadly nerve gas into bombs, and, thursday, a bipartisan group of senators expressed support for the obama administration's regime over the use of bilogical weapons. senators spoke to reporters for 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, i'm here with my colleagues from the senate, senator lieberman, senator coons, and senator graham, and we are deeply disturbed by reports that assad may have weaponnized stores of chemical and bilogical agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggest they are in waiting quarters waiting to use the weapons. in true, this may men that the united states and our allies facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction in syria, and this may be the last worng we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close, and we may instead be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the sidelines and hope a m
of the salvation army and changing the role in the u.s.. islamic the salvation army which many people don't realize is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside of department stores in the christmas season it's what they call the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas especially impoverished areas would have parades' and make lots of malaise the symbols trying to attract especially the urban poor back into the religious life. this came against the requirements of many cities that any trade would be permitted, for exhibit, and in the salvation army they made it a practice not to apply and to be arrested often playing their instruments on the way into the cell and challenging them as antireligious, and they won a lot of them. they also lost a lot of them so they kind of destabilized the law in the states by challenging these restrictions. they never really needed to the supreme court of the united states the because the states were still in howard. >> professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme court? >> the cases from t
weeks the u.s. policy tornado the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's that big meeting on april 23rd with molotov and april 23rd, the united states changed course, and so at that meeting, truman meets molotov -- first meet with advisers and they're divided. marshall, leahy, are all telling him don't break with the soviets. said to the secretary of war and said, the soviets have a much better understand of their open security, especially around poland, than we do. >> stepping back from the details, do you think it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each of whom had, i think, it's fair to say, an empire, one formal, one a little more informal, because the soviets had different, smaller states under their control, and going to keep control of the baltic states and moving into eastern europe. was it realistic for these two powers, who are very different, to really get along for very long or were they really destined to have a cold war and luckily never really had a hot war except through proxies. so details are important, an
have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by other powers we want to sustain a presence in the asia-pacific. same to is the middle east. as you look at these different areas i think that there are terrific opportunist who engage with china on each of them. and to fundamentally ask the question and try to answer the question secretary clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to real
yesterday the committee received a letter from scott blackman of the u.s. olympic committee stating, quote, given the stringent review process, the utmost confidence in the approved testing methods to detect h. g. h. and i ask unanimous consent to answer this letter. >> without objection so ordered. >> we now to the gentleman from tennessee. >> thank you for joining us today. i will take this in a different direction than we have forgotten so far as a practicing physician for 20 years, we are overlooking to some extent the source of the problem here and to my knowledge ag age is not something you can go down to gmc and get. it has to be prescribed by a physician. i know from my experience i have had a patients come and who were undersized and off of the growth charge and those discussions have occurred whether it is appropriate to use this hormone and generally that is referred to an endocrinologist. what is confusing to me is why is this so readily accessible and who are the doctors who are providing this for the wrong reasons and why is the punishment not starting their and maybe we don'
deliver a major boost to u.s. economic growth. i realize that many of our colleagues have different priorities when it comes to fixing our broken immigration system, but the reforms contained in the stem jobs act enjoy bipartisan support. so i would urge my colleagues, let's show the world that we can agree on this common sense, bipartisan immigration reform. let's do something for our economy and let's take this first step in our broken -- solving our broken immigration system. now, let me say, before i turn the floor over to my colleague from kentucky, who i know has some comments on this topic, let me address two issues quickly and that is, i can anticipate hearing from some of our colleagues, this doesn't solve all of what's broken in our immigration system and i concede that that's correct. but what we need more than anything is to develop some confidence-building measures for the american people to demonstrate that we can come together, republicans and democrats alike, and do what needs to be done, which everybody -- almost everybody agrees is common sense, and then we can fol
to be gone as well. what makes it different and we just saw? >>guest: satin finish coin.3 the u.s. government makes a regular (...) they made a present terry presentational (...) it has the west point mint mark and in the history of the u.s. government and they have been making them since 1986 they had done five of them. 2006 7 8 and 2011 and 2012. the 2011 sold out and we sold out in 1st day of . this is the6 c13 quantities at 1249.260 left so we soldthink i've done a price break a satin finish silver eagle coin like this. i cannot to the 2006, 2007, 2008 or 2011 and i should not do 2012 at this price but it is the final quantities because we are getting ready for 2013, so i am going to go ahead and do something i never did before. $169.95 is a spectacular price up for $20 often is my holiday gift to you. certified perfect and 1st day of issue which is exclusive to us here at hsn. there is no way other than here you can get it for you cannot buy it anywhere else.13 them gone emitter's so. in a minute or and 350 left now. >>host: a $3,000 set and sometimes there is not flex p
that the first wave of troops were u.s. marines. they wanted to bring their own helicopters, the own logistics. so they did was to work with u.s. army soldiers in the areas in and around the city of kandahar. it was this tale of our own services fighting with each other instead of fighting in common purpose against the enemy. and the stories go on. there was into fighting then the state department, within the u.s. agency for international development. and one other tale, i recount in some detail in the book, we had some real serious in fighting between president own national security team and senior people at the state department, over the whole question of what is it wise to try to broach potential peace talks with the taliban. we wound up spending 18 months fighting with one another in washington as opposed to uniting a common person to try to achieve the present school in the country. >> who is summer? >> so, she is a young american woman who come and there she is on the bottom right, who had extensive foreign development experience and put her hand up to go to afghanistan. to try to rebuil
a collaborative flee to support the u.s. efforts and what is a very challenging and dynamic security humanitarian and diplomatic context. thank you very much for your testimony. we will take a brief break while the second panel comes. >> we would like to now turn to the second panel one today's hearing about mali and the path forward. our second panel will include mr. niikwao akuetteh and joining us live this is our first attempt at live testimony by google [inaudible] i suspect nobody has testified by this, the thing i didn't know existed. so my thanks to the technical assistance and the policy support of several very capable folks who made this happen. dr. fomunyoh you may begin and we appreciate your testimony today >> thank you, chairman to an and ranking member isaacson pivot on behalf of the national democratic institute, have the opportunity to discuss the political developments in mali. today crisis is two-thirds of the country which is humanitarian and has admitted for under 50,000 people. the political uncertainty in the capitol and the severe food shortage that is affecting the entire
authorizing u.s. companies to the best of their pension funds, doing business with iran's energy sector. february of this year he offered a bipartisan resolution passed by unanimous vote of the senate for iran's right to freedom of assembly, speech and due process. day earlier iranians had taken to the street in peaceful demonstrations against the government or pressed by the siege of militia men. in times of peace and conflict he has traveled to the region to preserve the interests of our allies. in july he led a foundation to the middle east to discuss the ongoing threat posed by iran to review developments in the middle east peace process and traveled to saudi arabia, iraq, israel, lebanon, egypt, he met with u.s. troops in iraq and kuwait and iraq with vice president joe biden and general commander of u.s. troops, during the fighting in gaza. senator kc --casey has said we must prevent hamas, israel has the right to set up a naval blockade, key weapons to hamas and responsibility to protect its homeland. hamas is a terrorist organization that denies israel's right to exist and indis
'll make a couple of suggestions. you might try picturing a burning u.s. warship at pearl harbor. or if you'd rather do a happier image, how about a man kissing a woman, leaning and kissing a woman in times square in new york on the third day. or maybe you prefer politics. how about churchville, stalin and roosevelt a filter sitting down together. maybe that image. or maybe you'd rather think of something from the america of that area roughly, maybe a little bit earlier, the great depression, to get an image in your mind of the great depression. if you're having trouble, think of it tired him a worried looking at another stare off into the distance with a ragamuffin child leaning on each shoulder. can you find that famous iconic image in your mind? that image by dorothea lange called migrant mother that has come to symbolize the great depression. the images you've conjured up in your mind have been black and white. very, very likely. so i'd like you to do the same exercise but think of japanese imprisonments. think of the imprisonment of japanese americans during the war. so what are you pi
and certain stories hit. this was the genesis for the book. i saw how the u.s. military particularly the air force defeated geography in the balkans. it turns out the army did well despite of, and the successful conclusion to the war in bosnia and kosovo were a factor in allowing nato to expand to the black sea although nobody really wrote to that. and what is really the success of the balkans and a panel and we were bloodied to bits in somalia that made people think we can do anything. and that's when geography got its revenge in the mountains and the desert sahara and afghanistan because the transformative moment for me i was embedded with the first battalion of the marine. en and coo eight in march of 2004 we were making an overland journey with several hundred miles to fallujah and it wasn't yet on the news, the battle of fallujah was still a month away, the first battle of fallujah and all we did this transport one marine battalion from one place to another, it wasn't particularly dangerous, but the statistics were absolutely immense. gas stations, mountains of water models, tool kits,
the overall agreement, so the u.s. policy towards the soviet union is going to change in april of 1945. by the time there's a big meeting on april 23rd on april april 23rd the united states had changed course so at that meeting first teammates with his advisers one-fifth within marshall, leahy telling him they are grateful to the soviets and since the secretary of war understood the soviets have a much better understanding to their own security especially around poland than we do. >> stepping back from those details, do you think that it was realistic for these two powerful nations, continental powers, each to ochre and had i think was fair to say the entire one for all because the soviets obviously have their own different smaller states under the control and fifth. whether the two powers were in there is the logical bases to get along for very long. of course it never would have happened, but arguably stabenow as you know himself who is the head of the communist party told the communists and 45 get ready for the class war to continue in effect. don't believe the peaceful coexistence
. in it they argue that u.s. leaders must chart a course for the future by first facing what they call the country's troubling history of drifting further away from its democratic traditions. >> host: hello peter and oliver. i've taught with peter at american university. let me start by having both of you talk about the theme of this and how you wrote it? >> guest: i was invited in 1996 to go to this class at american university researching oliver storms america and one of the classes i was very popular. i went very impressed with it and the range of students and afterwards peter suggested that there was a great story about the atomic him in the atomic bomb always fascinated me because i was born the year after it was dropped and it was in new york city, the center of the world and my father was republican and a conservative. he served in world war ii as eisenhower said the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which it grew and anything we did was in the shadow of that. so i was curious about it and the bomb story really does have another origin. the book about the scientist of the 30s and ab
a lot about u.s. history. the first time c-span covered my the politically incorrect guide to american history. it's one of the book, the title itself. my favorite c-span memory was at at the borns and noble there to do a book signing. my publishers forget to tell me c-span was coming. i get there and the manager of the store says c-span is setting up over there. i said, i'm sorry, what? c-span is -- i had to respondent usely come up with an hour's talk on the spot. it went great. i came to the conclusions i should not script any of my talk. it was a turning point in my life thanks to you guys. >> what is your background? educationally bachelors from hoovered. ph.d. at colombia in u.s. history. i taught. i've been a senior fellow at the institute. and now i run my own educational thing called liberty classroom.com. now that we're living in the information revolution, it's a revolution that makes ambiguitien berg look like a bum. i teach u.s. history to anybody who is interested in learning about it through the site. i keep busy. >> you live in kansas. >> yes. we have to me on for anoth
the state department released a review of the attack on the u.s. consulate benghazi and found, could come systemic failures and leadership management deficiencies. just after the report was released, as to state departments testified about the attack before the house foreign affairs committee. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] the committee will come to order. after recognizing myself and the ranking member for seven minutes each for our opening statement we will then hear from our witnesses, deputy secretary william burns and deputy secretary tom, no strangers to what is we can allow the members to question our witnesses correctly as soon as possible we will forgo additional billing statements and instead i will recognize each member for six minutes following the presentation by the witnesses fought secretary clinton was scheduled to be here today but we have had to reschedule if her parents do to the unfortunate injury for which we wish her a speedy and healthy recovery. she has a confirmed once again she has every intention of testifying before our committee by mid ja
last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfa
climate change is probably not going to be resolved in the next policy and the u.s. -- am optimistic we can make progress. we're making progress by don't think we'll get a national bill to deal with climate change, so that would be top of my agenda. >> assuming the tax reform gets done, i think it's education issues. >> the first thing i would think my bias would be short-term stimulus, long-term deficit reduction, and then immigration reform. and once, if we get past all that, we could have serious conversations about other things. >> that's great. we're going to stay here and we're going to have a quick welcome from jocelyn from fti. she's going to talk to us a little bit more about the polling, the audience polling. she's coming. great. spent then was would do the polling will take questions from the audience. >> aecom everybody. thanks again for being here, and thanks for doing with her technical difficulty. hopefully we are in the click a. so as you can see this is the first poll question that i mentioned, so again, phones and computers at the ready. you can either text or twitch r
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
with the nature of intelligence. >> maochun yu, you are a professor of history here at the u.s. naval academy. this is his book, "oss in china prelude to cold war." professor, where are you from originally? >> i originally came from china. the city was the wartime capital of china. that's for all the major players in the book stay, and so since my childhood, i was intrigued by a lot of things. the oss was the wartime intelligence office. the reason why i couldn't write a book like this was because a late 1980s, bill casey who was the president of ronald reagan's cia director, he was also a history buff, decided to want to open up all the oss operation files. no one in the world had done it. you open up your own intelligence days of the entire operation file. that's amazing. so now it's at the national archives in college park, maryland. it's a gigantic record file. it has about 8000 feet of files. so i delved into this and i found some of the fascinating stuff. so i decided to write the book, and the book was first published in 1997 on the 50th anniversary of the cia. so it sold relatively we
the myriad questions one could ask about the future of u.s. detention policy in the war on terrorism, the government's ability to detain without trial individuals suspected of involvement in terrorism, it seems that the one that dominates all others is the extent to which future u.s. to some policy will and should be subject to judicial review. why is this not settled? well, if you the citizens and non-citizens, i think it's both sold and moved that these dissensions will be subject to review, settled because we have a series of cases in the early part of the last decade or the courts actually rejected arguments offered by the bush and restoration that such cases raised a political question settled because these individuals clearly have rights of the constitution including the right tit review and neat because dss has not picked up anyone hitting this category and subject -- subjected them to end of military tension says it doesn't three. there have only been three cases in custody their detention in austin years now, and i think that's partly going to stay for a while. it settled at
be able to know as u.s. senators working to protect the -- the fourth amendment. mr. president, we have always struck a balance in this country between an overbearing government and the important pathway to obtaining information relevant to our national security. the amendment that i'm laying forth strikes that balance appropriately. it urges the process to continue of providing an understanding of what the secret court interpretations are. that's very important in democracy. it provides the appropriate balance with national security. it gives clear decision-making authority to the attorney general in this process and in that sense, it does the best possible path that honors national security concerns while demanding transparency and accountable for this issue of privacy and protection of the fourth amendment. thank you, mr. president. mr. wyden: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from oregon. mr. wyden: how much time for purposes of general debate remains on our side and how much under the control of the distinguished chair of the committee? the presiding officer: the op
the iranian threat. however, i'm particularly concerned about the security at the u.s. embassy as the agent location of the facility leave our people there particularly vulnerable. i often find myself comparing the geopolitics of the south caucasus to accordion not. a tangle of current events of these countries in the region isolated from their neighbors. unfortunately, such isolation can blame to the hands of hours laying on the periphery of the region. press reports and conversations i had while i was in the region indicate that iran is taking or at least has the potential to take advantage of armenians regional isolation and thus the country's economic dependence on their common border to use armenian banks and enterprises to skirt international sanctions. the united states and our regional partners including armenia must be vigilant by fully comply current laws and regulations, and by a many sanctions is needed to close the loopholes. i hope that legislation is currently pending in the congress makes it way through rapidly and will do just that. regarding energy, sanctions are an essent
. >> welcome we are interviewing u.s. freedom fries. do you find a lot of opposition to some of the ideas in the book? >> now, people are very much -- that's at this event is about. it's about three people and free markets and people understand what's in this book. the whole idea that you the needs of people by free enterprise. what is free enterprise? if people try to meet their needs and the needs of others. that's what it's about. they understand entrepreneurial business. they understand effect to create jobs not through government, better innovation. innovation has created the most jobs. the government and then the automobile? no. >> elizabeth ames, what it's like to write a book? >> is a great learning experience and in a way that recertified higher education. customized and better. >> one of the themes we've been talking with authors here at freedom test about the moralism of a moralism about capitalism. is there a moral component interview? >> is the subject of the next book coming out at the end of the month -- the end of august. capitalism has moral because it's about getting rea
national defense, history and geography of, and the u.s. economy. a television series based upon pages history of the estates is currently in development as well. we are pleased to welcome dr. schweikart today to hear about his newest book, "a patriot's history of the modern world," which in this case is going to be from 1898 to just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. larry? [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and it's one that which my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great passions of liberty and a swelling sea of collectivism. you probably do know that you are getting somebody here that was a previous rock drummer. this later became significant in learning, as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along my expenses in the rock band were pretty informative. i, student i know all about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing and start. when mike allen and i wrote "a patriot's history of the united states"
of judge paul william grimm of maryland to be a u.s. district judge for the district of maryland. i'm very proud of the process that senator mikulski has instituted for us making recommendations to the president to fill judicial appointments. i believe that under this process, we have reached to get the very best to recommend to the president and then to our colleagues for confirmation, and judge grimm clearly falls within this line. the senate judiciary committee favorably reported judge grimm's nomination by voice vote on june 7 of this year. judge grimm was nominated to fill the vacancy in maryland that was created when u.s. district judge benson e.laig took senior status in june. judge grimm brings a wealth of experience to this position. early in his career, he served in the military in the judge advocate corps handling commercial litigation in private practice and served as assistant attorney general of maryland. he also sat as a federal magistrate judge in maryland for 15 years. judge grimm was born in japan and received his undergraduate degree from the university of california in
the globe media not always involving the u.s., though certainly the risk of increasing globally. based on our fiscal picture. the point that i would want to make is the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table. when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long line of dealing with these issues overtime to give the defense department time and they can make in my view very significant changes in the budget, but doing it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient and dangerous to security in our s. my final point is that they are missing an element in this town is primarily political will, and i say that with regard to both political parties and the solution that has to be forthcoming in the weeks ahead and the months ahead will require the leaders to first of all put our nation fi
'm an avid viewer of "homeland" about a trader working his way up in the u.s. government positioning himself as a vice president and the mas nations of a henry wallace. i think the more obvious reason why i'm invited because nathaniel is extremely, extremely, very, very, very persistent and would not take no for an answer although i explainedded i have little knowledge of chambers beyond reading the book when i was proxzly 16 years old, and having been influenced by it, i'm not in any way an expert on chambers, witness, influence, but i will talk as directed. [laughter] i want to pick up a little bit from where elliot started, and i might add, by the way, the irony that both elliot and i happen to hail from an organization that counts on foreign relations that chambers would have seen as a hot bed of pinko. the world changes. when i think of "witness," when i think of it, i think not just of the fact it's a document of great literary power, of which it is and heart of its literary appeal, but it was a weapon in the ideological battle against communism that was raging when it came out. it was
. for the u.s. and others in the community support a federal solution the eastern congo with full knowledge this is likely rwanda's primary objective in the first place? stepping back from the current dynamics, federalism and another sub is neither inherently good or bad proposition , but when driven by neighboring state which would benefit enormously from it, federalism can be problematic to say the least. diplomats commonly affirmed everyone they can and must be a part of a solution. which solution i would ask. the rwandan solution for this crisis appears to have been identified well before the shots were even fired. thank you, mr. chairman for the opportunity to share the findings. >> thank you for her testimony. and now mr. prendergast. >> thank you for your extraordinary commitment to the people of the congo. deeply appreciated by everyone in this room. i want to begin by echoing something you said, congressman smith, earlier in the hearing. no one is questioning the hard work and dedication in decades of long commitment to key administration officials have exhibited on behalf of peace
of what they sell and produce is exported all around the world. they want the u.s. economy to be stronger as quickly as possible and robust as quickly as possible because it means they'll continue to ask for. as much as they try to move from an export economy to a domestic consumption-based economy, and the reality is the more americans were coming for money they have in the pocket and the more they'll be shopping in stores. the healthier the u.s. economy is, the more they china will export and that means jobs for the chinese people. >> how much are they actually worried about the united states and how much time and attention are they paying to overdo it and enough relationship versus there are internal issues? >> i think the united states is incredibly important in china and they recognize that not only did their part to always ambassador locke has just described, but in another way i think you could say it's more psychological. it's a 150 year history where china has been trying to chain itself up into big power status. it's not there is very close to being there. get their just lingeri
administration had against him, had tried against him. because syria was -- opposed the u.s. led invasion of iraq in 2003. the syrian government was looking the other way or even supporting jihaddists who were entering into iraq and killing american and allies forces. so the u.s. and syria were on opposite sides of the street, to say the least. he survived that. he survived the association with the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february of 2005, in a damning un report that was leaked that held syria responsible. he survived all that and actually emerged in somewhat flying colors by 2008-2009, accepted back into the regional order, into the international community, even representatives at an anational plows meeting to jump start the arab-israeli peace talk. so i think he developed a sense of survivalism. he and his supporters. to the point where, when you have another challenge, and the most serious to date, obviously, since march 2011 and continuing today, that sense of triumphantism, that they're on the right side of history, sense of destiny, and i sincerely believe if i ta
stability and security of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interest. and, of course, the keys to success will be innovative access agreements, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases, efficient force posture initiatives that will maximize the dollars that we are given to stand. and it also is by putting our most capable forces forward, as was her newest most advanced equipment to ensure we effectively operate with our allies and partners across a wide range of operations as we work together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep these opening remarks at little shorter than the last time, so i can get to your questions. so i'd like to finish up with a couple of thoughts. the rebalanced is based on a strategy of collaboration and cooperation. thought containment. and that the united states is a pacific power that will remain a pacific power, and we at pacom look forward to doing our part to keep asia is difficult full, peaceful and secure for decades to come. thank you. >> will take our first question writer spent admiral, thank you for meeting
it, but that would be acceptable. >> rick, your turn. >> as the chairman of the global stearate u.s.a., i have to agree with jack. i won't expound on that. you know, there was no way when i was deeply involved in the issue in the early 80s that i could've foreseen gorbachev. nor could i foreseen the treaty. the zero option when it was propounded was preposterous. i post it. so did the secretary of state. reviewed this and i guess this is the lesson. we view this is largely a challenge and an opportunity and strengthen the alliance. we saw ourselves under threat. the doublecheck decision on deployment of the missiles was part of a broader political military exercise to strengthen the alliance to deal with whatever the next challenge we would face from the soviet union. what i have to say is you have to learn to pay that and that's exactly what the reagan administration did when they found themselves with somebody they can do business with. it could and ronald reagan may have been the only guy in the administration that believed in the near option that by god u.n. after. and here i ha
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